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BPC 157 Interactions in Mucosal Protection in Stress

This trial studies several mechanisms of action for BPC157.

 

Digestive-Diseases-and-Sciences-JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences Journal
March 1997, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 661-671

Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 Interactions with Adrenergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Mucosal Protection in Stress

 

Abstract
Since superior protection against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions and anti inflammatory and analgesic activities were noted for pentadecapeptide BPC (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice protein named BPC), the beneficial mechanism of BPC 157 and its likely interactions with other systems were studied.

Hence its beneficial effects would be abolished by adrenal gland medullectomy, the influence of different agents affectingα, β, and dopamine receptors on BPC 157 gastroprotection in 48 h restraint stress was further investigated. Animals were pretreated (1 hr before stress) with saline (controls) or BPC 157 (dissolved in saline) (10 μg or 10 ng/kg body wt intra peritoneally or intra gastrically) applied either alone to establish basal conditions or, when manipulating the adrenergic or dopaminergic system, a simultaneous administration was carried out with various agents with specific effects on adrenergic or dopaminergic receptors[given in milligrams per kilogram intraperitoneally except for atenolol, which was given subcutaneously] phentolamine (10.0), prazosin (0.5),yohimbine (5.0), clonidine (0.1) (α-adrenergicdomain), propranolol (1.0), atenolol (20.0)(β-adrenergic domain), domperidone (5.0), and haloperidol(5.0) (peripheral/central dopamine system).

Alternatively, agents stimulating adrenergic ordopaminergic systemsadrenaline (5.0) or bromocriptine(10.0)-were applied. A strong protection, noted following in tragastric or intraperitoneal administration of BPC157, was fully abolished by co administration of phentolamine, clonidine, and haloperidol, andconsistently not affected by prazosin, yohimbine, ordomperidone.

Atenolol abolished only intraperitoneal BPC 157 protection, whereas propranolol affected specifically intragastric BPC 157 protection.Interestingly, the severe course of lesion developmentobtained in basal conditions, unlike BPC 157gastroprotection, was not influenced by the applicationof these agents. In other experiments, when adrenaline and bromocriptine were given simultaneously, a strong reduction of lesion development was noted.

However, when applied separately, only adrenaline, not bromocriptine, has aprotective effect. Thus, a complex protectiveinteraction with both α-adrenergic (e.g.,catecholamine release) and dopaminergic (central)systems could be suggested for both intragastric and intraperitoneal BPC 157 administration.

The involvement of β-receptor stimulation in BPC 157 gastroprotection appears to be related to the route of BPC 157 administration.The demonstration that a combined stimulation of adrenergic and dopaminergic systems by simultaneous prophylactic application of adrenaline(α- and β-receptor stimulant) and bromocriptine (dopamine receptor agonist) may significantly reduce restraint stress lesions development provides insight for further research on the beneficial mechanism of BPC 157.

 

Keywords

PENTADECAPEPTIDE BPC 157 PEPTIDE BPC GASTROPROTECTION ADRENERGIC DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEMS STRESS INTERACTION

Source for this article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1018880000644